Bed Bugs

Bed Bugs


Once associated with poverty and filth, the Bed Bug is no longer a “poor man’s bug”. Due largely to an increase in world travel, it has been experiencing a resurgence throughout the world, often invading upper-class hotels and homes. Though largely eradicated in the early 1940s with the use of strong insecticides such as D.D.T., they have become extremely resistant to available modern pesticides and are again near epidemic proportions in some industrialized nations, infesting homes, businesses, and institutions.Bedbugs are small, elusive, parasitic insects that live strictly by feeding on the blood of humans and other warm-blooded animals. The name ‘bed bug’ is derived from the insect’s preferred habitat of beds or other furniture where people may sleep or spend significant time and where the insect can easily hide until it comes out to feed. Bedbugs, though not strictly nocturnal, are mainly active at night and are typically capable of feeding unnoticed on their sleeping hosts.Bedbugs can be transported inadvertently through infested furniture or contaminated, used clothing. However, even new furniture can be exposed to bedbugs during storage or in delivery vehicles. Toys such as stuffed dolls, etc. can be infested as well as clothing items shared by school-aged children.
The Shoreline Services Solution:
The first step is identification of the insect. There are insects that act similar to Bed Bugs that are nearly identical in appearance, yet quite different in source, origin and control. In addition, people react differently to skin irritations caused by a variety of sources so, the appearance of “bites” on the skin is not evidence enough to warrant a potentially expensive treatment. If you suspect you have a problem and can capture a sample insect, contact our office to arrange to have the insect professionally identified by our staff. We can then discuss possible sources of infestation and what options are available .  There is never a fee for such insect identification and all discussions are kept confidential to protect your privacy and dignity.(Image © Whitney Cranshaw, Colorado State University, Bugwood.org)

Didn’t find the pest you were looking for? click here for personal assistance